Soil Block Making - A Complete Guide to Start Seedlings

Soil Block Making - A Complete Guide to Start Seedlings

 A “soil block” is a square of potting soil that is compressed into a mold forming a block. It is a method of indoor seed starting. Instead of using container to contain the soil as is usually the case with starting seeds indoors, the compressed soil serves as both the container and the soil medium all in one!

Usually roots will encircle a container once they reach a certain size. With a soil block, instead of roots encircling a container, they are “air-pruned”. This allows for a seamless transplant with virtually no transplant shock. 

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10 Tips for Storing Garden Vegetables Through Winter

10 Tips for Storing Garden Vegetables Through Winter

While not all of us have a root cellar (I don’t), we can make the most of the storage spaces we have. Ventilation is very important if you want to prolong the life of your vegetables. 

In the ideal root cellar set up, you would have a cold air intake vent at the base of the root cellar wall and on an opposite wall and the top would be the warm air outtake vent. Cross ventilation is best.

In my basement, I don’t have either of those things, but it is unheated, and it’s not closed off tight from the rest of the house so it does get some ventilation, though not the ideal kind. 

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30+ Best Storage Vegetables and Varieties for Winter Cold Storage

30+ Best Storage Vegetables and Varieties for Winter Cold Storage

In the year round garden, when the going gets tough (freezing temps, winter storms, you name it!), you need to have a backup source of food, and more specifically, fresh food. 

Even with vegetables that can extend your season (mentioned HERE) and low tunnels, once you hit very cold temperatures there isn’t much left in the garden. January through March is when I really struggle to do 100% backyard garden vegetables because of prolonged periods of cold, ice, and snow. I’m in zone 6b so if you are in a colder zone this period is probably longer.

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How to Build A Low Tunnel

How to Build A Low Tunnel

I have a very special guest post today by Cameron! He is the builder around here and because he can explain this way better than I can, he is going to give you all the details on how to build a low tunnel. I also made my first ever YouTube video to explain the process if you prefer to just watch rather than read (please keep that in mind as your watching haha!).

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Top 15 Cold-Tolerant Vegetables for Fall & Winter Gardening

Top 15 Cold-Tolerant Vegetables for Fall & Winter Gardening

Cold Hardy vegetables can be killed anywhere from 30ºF all the way down to -5ºF and possibly lower. It covers such a wide range of temperature that they are usually put into two different groups, semi cold hardy which can take light frosts and cold hardy which can survive to 20ºF and below. 

First let's talk about the crops that can take several light frosts. Light frosts would be in the 28-32ºF range. Crops that can handle light frosts include lettuce, swiss chard, arugula, radishes, beets, chinese cabbage, collards, cauliflower, celery, turnips, and green onions.

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How to Plan for a Fall Garden

How to Plan for a Fall Garden

Planting a fall garden seems easy enough. And yet there are always a few details and kinks to work out when it comes to planning for any garden.

A fall garden is ready to harvest in fall which means you are planting and sowing seeds in the summer. Do you want to know the secret to success? Psst… the secret is do not miss the planting window.

In years past, I’ve been so busy with harvesting and preserving my summer crops that I miss the window for certain fall crops. This year, I’m already doing better (though not perfect haha!). I made a fall planning chart to help me to plant on time. I’m sharing my fall planner below as well as some tips in hopes that it helps you too!

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5 Tips for Growing Broccoli with Success

5 Tips for Growing Broccoli with Success

Tip #1 Plant at the right time of year.

This is a major key in growing broccoli successfully. During head formation broccoli plants need cool days and cool nights. In most of the United States they can be grown either in the fall or in the spring.

Spring planting: Start seed indoors before 8 to 10 weeks before the average last frost.  Transplant into the garden 3-4 weeks before the average last frost.

Fall planting: Start seed indoors 15 to 17 weeks before average first frost of fall. Transplant outdoors 10-12 weeks before average first frost of fall…

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